Sircle Squad Profile: Lauren Utecht

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Full name/nickname: Lauren Utecht. Sometimes people just shorten my name to Laur or Lau.

Age: 22

University & Major: Roger Williams University. Major – Journalism, Minor – Film, and Concentration – Spanish

What made you choose Sircle Media? I decided to apply to Sircle Media because after researching the company and looking at their website, I really liked their overall vision and POV on social media. At school, I was introduced to the power of social media and all things digital. I believe it has opened up a window of opportunity for brands to have conversations, develop relationships and show that they care about their customers by sharing personal stories and giving them an inside look at their company through the use of digital elements. Sircle Media really emphasized this idea and I knew it was somewhere I could enhance my skills. I always make sure I can believe in a company before I interview with them. Most importantly, I really liked the company environment as it seemed positive and productive. Everyone was extremely friendly, encouraging and I could see that there was a lot of opportunity for growth. That is why I ultimately chose Sircle Media.

Most surprising discovery/realization after working here? The most surprising thing I’ve learned after working here is that brands don’t need to take their social media management too seriously. What I mean is that people don’t want a product being shoved down their throats on social media and most likely aren’t going to take the time to read a long caption explaining a product. I always knew it was best to keep captions short, but I’m really learning to have fun with my posts. It’s OK to be silly and make jokes and puns because it shows off the brand’s personality, explains who they are, what they stand for and breaks the ice between sellers and buyers.

What’s the best part of your job? The best part of my job is that it is not restrictive at all and I have a ton of autonomy. With social media, every day is different from the last and I get an opportunity that most new hires don’t, which is to have fun while learning new skills. Social media forces me to be creative, innovative and keep up with all of the latest trends. Social Media Managers have the ability to create content that can influence a culture and shape the future. That is really exciting and encourages me to be better.

What can you tell us about Adam or your supervisor? I’ve been working really closely with Sara Lerner on a few brands. Both she and Adam truly care about their employees. They help me believe in myself because they took a chance on me very early on in my career. They are now teaching me everything it takes to be a Social Media Manager, from building relationships with clients to managing day to day functions and even experimenting with audiences by promoting posts. They are always accessible if I need help and when I have questions, they get back to me right away. They are always reminding me that no question is dumb and are constantly encouraging me.

Advice to future interns/employees? My advice would be to ask questions and research topics you don’t feel comfortable with. It’s always better to make sure you’re doing something correctly than guess and make a mistake because you were too nervous to ask.

Bonus Questions:

What are three songs that never fail to get you hyped?: “Closer” by the Chainsmokers, “Levels” by Avicii and “All of the Lights” by Kanye West ft. Rihanna and Kid Cudi.

What is something about you that people would be surprised to know?: My sister and I did competitive gymnastics since we were very young. I was always getting injured and eventually had to give it up at the beginning of high school, after my third broken arm because I fell too far behind on my skills.

What cartoon/movie character were you inexplicably afraid of as a kid?: I wasn’t really afraid, but I hated the “The Emperor’s New Groove” for some reason when all of my friends were obsessed with it.

Favorite hobbies? I love to travel and see new places around the world. I’m a firm believer that spending money on experiences rather than on material items makes you happier. I love to run, as I ran track all throughout high school and college. I like to cook and experiment with new recipes, read a lot and watch really good movies because film has always been another interest of mine. I also love playing with my dog and spending time with family and friends! :)

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On contradictions and how they can ruin your social media strategy…

On this episode, I talk about how contradictions will kill your social media efforts.  It is mission critical to figure out what you want to have happen and then hire someone (internal employee or agency partner) that you feel knows what they are doing to implement. Then it is wise to get out of their way and let them do what they do. Stating KPIs or needs and then putting roadblocks or hurdles in place that make those harder to hit is just not good business.

We encourage brands to really think about the creative direction they want to go in, the engagement style they feel good about and the growth KPIs and metrics for success they feel are right and then clearly articulate them up front. Then they should turn the wheel over to their trusted partner and let them do what they do.

Why hedge? Go all in and reap the benefits…

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On the long and winding road of entrepreneurship…

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Being an entrepreneur is not for the faint of heart. It is a constant barrage of stress, issues, fires and losses, balanced (only sometimes) with flickers of greatness and short-term wins along the way. I have heard it often compared to jumping out of an airplane and only first starting to build the parachute mid-air. I think that visual is a fair one.

We are living in a time, where it seems kind of cool to run your own business and I think it is seen as the easier option when compared to being an employee at someone else’s business. It is not, this I can promise you. Sure, calling yourself a founder and hanging out and not working all day is very easy. Actually creating an enterprise that is built to last and showing continuous growth year over year, is a very different task. If you want to win in that game you need to know that:

1. The buck stops with you: You are now responsible for all of the decisions. Entrepreneurs have an incredible opportunity to create something from nothing, which you cannot generally accomplish when working for someone else. With this upside, comes the downside of making all of the big decisions about what must be done, when and how. You can’t wait for things to happen, or for someone to tell you what to do, you must make them happen for yourself.

2. You must always be working on “the now” and “the later”: You need to execute efficiently on the day to day work, while also planning and prospecting for the future. As an entrepreneur, you have to project your mind forward and think about next month, quarter, year etc. Nobody else is out there bringing you new business, managing your renewals and developing the brand. It is grounding to know that what you do, or don’t do, today, will have an impact on your business down the line. This creates a sense of urgency and forces the winner to constantly put in the “extra reps” to produce better gains.

3. You have to have thick skin and be able to endure rejection: When you try and sell your products or services you are certain to hear a lot of no’s. It never feels good, but it is much more personal and harder to take when it is your own baby. You have to be able to set (and then stay) the course, despite the many rough water days that lie in your path.

4. You have to constantly be learning and tweaking: You can never have a “set it and forget it” mentality.  I think a lot of entrepreneurs want to set up their business, get it to a point where it is humming and then work less and enjoy the fruits of their labor. While that might be the case for some very lucky ones, that is definitely an outlier. For most of us, you need to be iterating, researching and modifying processes each and every day. You cannot get comfortable and can never put your feet up and relax. It is a constant uphill climb, and while it is ok to look down and be proud of what you have built from time to time, you do need to look upward nearly all of the time.

5. You must know your numbers:  While this is admittedly not my strongest skill, it is such an important element of success.  Meaning, if you aren’t watching cash flow and managing your pipeline religiously, it can be game over, real quick. You need to set substantial “reach goals” and drive towards hitting them from an offense POV constantly.  On the defensive side of the ball, you need to plan for potential puddles along the path and manage your overhead each month. I personally lean towards being more aggressive and investing in my people (compensation, perks, food, and fun) and marketing (website, collaterals, video), so I need to make sure I score a ton of points on offense to win my games.

8. You are always on: As an entrepreneur, especially one with employees and paying clients, it is an all the time thing. While you definitely have more control over your hours and location, you will always be thinking about the business. Usually, those thoughts are about what can go wrong and/or what you are not doing well. It is an interesting feeling of never being good enough, which is an uncomfortable and sometimes defeating view for most.  There is no reprieve, it is always there.

At the end of the day, you have to be totally focused and committed, super gritty and the kind of person who is ok with constantly being consumed by your brand and it’s success.  Plenty of people are in this role without these traits, and they will not make it long term. It doesn’t make anyone better or worse, it is just the way it is. It might take a very long time to build, and you might never feel as though you have truly succeeded. I can say that the road is long and winding, but beautiful and exciting too. I wouldn’t have it any other way…

 

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Why I am the Derek Jeter of social media…

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I know this one is a stretch, but hear me out.

So we are both originally from the tri-state area and both were accepted to The University of Michigan in the mid 90′s. Granted he did go on to win the World Series and Rookie of The Year Honors in 1996, while I had a 3.0 GPA and countless hangovers. Despite the rough start, my gritty spirit kicked in and I rallied back to have a 3.7 GPA because I wasn’t going out like that. I digress…

So we both moved to New York and spent our whole careers here. Every single day we got up, put on our uniform and went to work.  We both have confidence but rarely brag.  Both of us are, “rip your face off” competitive, yet we always compete fairly and honorably.  We despise losing, but would never cut corners to win. It really is about legacy over short-term gains, and that is what ultimately earns respect and admiration from others. #Re2pect

Being “The Captain” of my team it is imperative to remain even-keeled. I never get too high when we win new business or receive referrals or accolades, and I brush it off when we lose a pitch or have a client leave the agency. When running your own company it is a long season so to speak, and you need to go in knowing you won’t win all of the games.  Just like batting, if my career average is .300 I am a Hall of Famer.

We both work in highly competitive industries and have tons of competition, but never really sweat them. We know that we just need to work hard, put in 100% effort and just do what we are expected to do, and the rest will work itself out. It really doesn’t matter what the others around us do, because if we play our game then we will win.

We both married supermodels (at least in my eyes) and we are both gentlemen in how we approach the women in our lives. We are excellent teammates and always have the backs of those around us. Life is a marathon and how you treat people comes back around for sure. Act as if…

I even love how he partnered with Jordan, (my childhood hero) for a brand deal. Both are fierce competitors, but if you want the benchmark for doing things the right way personally and professionally then I have to go with Number 2, the best that ever did it!

 

 

 

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On why you can’t afford to not create video…

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With all of the compelling stats behind the need for video today, brands should be sprinting to get in the game, yet many are still mostly on the sidelines. I would say that the number one reason I hear as to why, is that they “can’t afford it right now” and will revisit it later. In my opinion this is a big mistake and I would strongly argue that they cannot afford not to spend on video. Let me explain.

If they are already committed to social media, trying to grow their own e-commerce platform (to earn better margins, have a direct dialogue with consumers rather than a 3rd party partner such as Amazon etc.) and really any type of online messaging, and they actually care about results and ROI, then video has to be a part of the mix.  It offers increased exposure, cheaper CPM’s and higher engagement. So if you are in digital marketing and looking to optimize your game, then you cant leave your 7 iron in the bag.  It is literally your number one tool to improve performance and get more for your dollar.

I think one of the fears with video is that it is just cost prohibitive. Historically this has been true as the market pricing has been high and for the most part is still out of whack. So if and when a brand actually takes the leap to create a brand video and shells out a lot of money, they say to themselves or their provider that the video “has to go viral”. They say that because they need massive reach and game changing results to rationalize the high price tag. You don’t need video to “go viral” (what does that really even mean anyway?) you need it to help augment your social content and storytelling and improve your website experience, email marketing and paid social efforts. With video, the performance in all of these categories skyrockets. You immediately compromise your results by not finding a way to “afford” video.

Now the problem is that most pure play video shops don’t really want to create micro content videos for social media, as they see it as the underbelly of the video space. They want to do longer form, higher priced and more intricate pieces. I get it, those are great, profitable and more fun. That doesn’t mean that the market doesn’t still need these videos in a very big way. On the other end of the spectrum there are interns, freelancers and even young and resourceful internal employees who can create one off videos. The issue there is the messaging is typically disjointed, not pursuant to a real strategy and these players don’t typically understand what works and does not work on social/digital. You really need a partner who gets it.  (ahem…Sircle Media…ahem)

Most brands (especially in a crowded category such as the healthy CPG space) need at least 3 core videos:

Product Front and Center Video: Puts your main product(s) on display so potential customers see your packaging and/or get a feel for what your product is. We recommend you feature your hero lineup and present that on Facebook and Instagram.  This you would boost to fans of competitors perhaps.

Describe The Product Video: Puts your main USP’s on display and can highlight the WHY behind the WHAT for one or all of your products.  This would target special interest groups for your ingredients or perhaps even be used as part of your retargeting efforts to move buyers further down the funnel that have already signed up for your email, visited your website and/or even engaged with your Facebook or Instagram content.

Retailer Call Out Video: Lets consumers know where to find you (i.e. Whole Foods) and conveys that the brand is “bigger/better” as it is in many stores/doors. These can be used to target fans of that retailer AND/OR can be used as part of your dark posting strategy, set to really drive foot traffic locally into a specific retailer without muddying up your timeline.  This is a very important tool to help your sales people out in the field, who are trying to get and keep your products on shelves.

All three of these video types are simple, yet impactful for your business online. The game has changed and brands need to adapt to it.  I spoke with a prospect this week and they had a brand/hero video (they paid a lot for back in 2015) front and center on their website.  It was actually uploaded on YouTube (because that was the default back then) and was just playing through a viewer. The video is cute and actually had thousands of views, but the problem was that YouTube was actually showing ads against the video and those ads were for another CPG. So if a consumer saw that and then clicked on the ad, it would actually take them away from the brand. In that sense it actually hurt that the video had a lot of views on YouTube.

So the bottomline is that any brand or business looking to win online needs to rethink video completely. They need to solve for a way to get videos made, to create many rather than one (why put all eggs in one basket?) and to understand how and where to use them in today’s online ecosystem.  Our recommendation is to not sit back and watch others in your space do it, while you wait til you can afford it. That is something you definitely cannot afford to do.

 

 

 

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On why I sometimes feel like a personal trainer…

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When clients hire Sircle Media it is very much like hiring a personal trainer.  At this point, (April 2017) they know they need smart social media management for their business, very much like a person knows they should make good diet choices and work out consistently.

When they begin with Sircle, things are awesome for the first couple of months. They are hopeful, attentive, responsive and full of energy.  It is really amazing and we immediately see an improvement in the quality of their content, the consistency of their engagement and if they truly listen, in the results (be it growth, reach, interaction, traffic etc.)!

There is a real parallel here to working out with a trainer. Right out of the gate you psychologically feel good, because you sense you are taking the right proactive action to improve how you look and feel.  You start to get consistent in your efforts, because that accountability partner makes you stick to a schedule and you see some early results. Those could be increased energy, stamina, dropping a couple of pounds OR just that false sense of immediate muscle mass increase that many feel, but isn’t truly there so early on.  Either way, things are good…

Then with both, you often hit a flat period. Results don’t pour in as fast and you start to question the value of the efforts.  With social media, this often leads to quick pivots that include cutting back on paid efforts, reducing or eliminating influencer outreach and/or missing scheduled meetings and punting social media while you focus on “more important initiatives” for the business. With training this can mean missing sessions, reducing efforts/reps/sets or even cheating with stress meals and focusing on other areas of your life, like work, family etc.  Truth is that in both cases, you need to figure out how to balance the social media/training with those other items if you really want to succeed.  It has to be in addition to, not in lieu of.

The main reason for churn at Sircle is when a client loses site of the marathon view and focuses solely on the sprint results. When numbers are flat, they often ignore any of their own contribution to that and will come at us aggressively looking for a silver bullet that will magically turn things around. We explain that they need to remain holistically committed to the cause and need to keep their head down and focused on the end goal. There is no ROI on any one tweet, but there is real fruit if you are patient and let the vines grow their grapes.

With training, it is very easy to blame them. You question why you aren’t seeing faster results, why things have plateaued and whether or not you should seek a new teacher. First off, the real long term results take awhile to see. Secondly, you might be sneaking doughnuts at night (which to me is the same as not spending Ad dollars on Facebook mind you) which will compromise results greatly.  Only the client/individual knows the real truth there.

When you leave a trainer, very much like when a brand leaves Sircle, there is typically a precipitous drop off across the board. Clients move on and we see their imagery, cadence and frequency take a big dip, as well as their engagement and growth efforts. It is so obvious, and just like with a trainer it reflects poorly on us, when they leave and “gain weight and get out of shape” so to speak. We literally have to either remove them from our website or tell new prospects the exact date we stopped working together, so they can see the difference between good (with us) and not so good (post us).

In the end of the day, your north star needs to be that you are fully aware that remaining committed to social media and personal training, is the right play long term. You wont survive professionally or personally if you dont figure out both. You need to then attack either with an unwavering commitment to it.  Most often, switching agency or trainer is not the right answer and working on listening more and developing that relationship more fully is.

I am actually amazed by how many of my former clients still come to me personally with questions, and still respect me and what we do so much, despite having moved on.  They usually know what they had and are fully aware about how things have turned since they left. My recommendation is to lean in, rather than leave with Sircle and the gym.  That is how we start to really see the results and reap the benefits together!

 

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Sircle Squad: Kasey Bandilla

Another awesome intern just wrapped up her semester with us and we will miss her dearly. Before she left, we sat down to learn a bit more about her and her experience at Sircle Media. Enjoy.

King KaseyFull name/nickname ? 

Kasey Bandilla and Nickname(s): Some common ones are Kase, KC, and Kaseydilla (like quesadilla – it’s a combination of my first and last name).

Age? 

I’m 20

University and Major? 

Fordham University and Communications & Media Studies

                                                                                                  What made you choose Sircle Media?

I chose Sircle Media because I wanted a challenge. Prior to this internship, I had some social media experience under my belt, but I knew that I had so much more to learn. I also wanted to join the Sircle squad because of the intimate work environment. I find that smaller environments provide more hands-on work and an overall better experience to learn and grow. And that’s exactly what I found here.

Most surprising discovery/realization after working here?

The amount of valuable hands-on experience. As an intern, I expected to get some grunt work, but as soon as I got here, I was immediately given projects and tasks that were directly helpful to the Social Media Managers. While some projects were daunting, the SMMs that I worked with were confident in my abilities and skills. Each day, I felt that I contributed meaningful content and was an actual member of the Sircle Media team, not just another intern.

What was the best part about your internship?

The environment. Everyone at Sircle is so easy to get along with. If I needed help or had questions, every single person offered assistance and didn’t hesitate to answer any questions that I had. I always looked forward to coming into the office because it’s such a comfortable and fun place to be. There’s definitely no shortage of laughs here.

What can you tell us about Adam or your supervisor?

Adam is one of the most driven, diligent, and eloquent people that I have ever met. He is the most easy-going boss I’ve ever had but he makes sure that you are hustling and working just as hard as he is. Not to mention, he’s also a excellent whistler. My supervisor, Sara, has been an amazing mentor. She’s passionate, motivating, and super insightful. Throughout my time at Sircle, she made it a point to learn what I liked to do and ensured that I was given those tasks. She made my experience very enjoyable.

Advice you would give to a future intern?

For future interns, don’t be afraid to ask questions. It might be overstated, but it’s true. Adam and your supervisor are here to help you learn and get the most out of your internship here at Sircle. Also, be open to all tasks and projects. Working on a wide range projects, I was able to further develop skills I already had and gain new ones that I wouldn’t have attained otherwise. Most importantly, have fun and enjoy your experience at Sircle. I definitely did!

 

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Referrals from all angles..

Sircle Referrals

I have written about how referrals make the world go round, on this blog before and once again I am reminded how true that is. Last week I received 6 referrals for business and they came from a variety of sources, all of which are appreciated more than the referrer knows.

Two came directly from happy clients, which are the most common types in my business. Those are obvious and awesome when they come to us and are a clear sign that we are doing great work for our clients day to day.

Great work and service, empowers WOM – Word of Mouth!

Two came from PR partners who had worked opposite us on brand relationships. Many of our clients have a PR Firm on hand and we are often forced into their sandbox and ordered to play nicely together. We used to get a lot of pushback from those partners as either A) they were trying to diversify and get into social media services and/or B) they just felt threatened by the new agency in the ecosystem. I have always said that we don’t offer PR and we believe that our efforts augment everything they do and vice versa. It is so nice to see that some of these firms have changed their posture, AND that they felt we offered great service and could pair very nicely with their offerings.

Teamwork does, make the dream work!

One came from the very type of relationship I referenced in my earlier blog post above. Someone I had mentored two years back, had landed at a new company and immediately told them they needed to hire us for their social media needs.

Long game, paying off!

The final and perhaps most gratifying one came from a former (and internal favorite) client, who left us abruptly earlier this year. They hired a new Director of Marketing who came in with their own ideas and agenda and ultimately pushed us out. This is hands down the number one reason for churn in our business and is so unfortunate, because if communication is excellent, it is usually unnecessary. Regardless, it was so great to receive this particular referral, as it was a statement that although we are no longer dating, they remain a fan and convinced that we add a ton of value. So much so that they recommended the client “hire us right away to learn and implement a real, make sense social strategy” and that client couldn’t wait to get started.

Client relationships don’t always end, just because they stop paying you!

I remain convinced that if you are passionate, provide great service, work hard and don’t lose your cool, that you can generate a referral funnel from all types of sources.  Everyone you come in contact with should be better off for having met you and you should leave an indelible mark on each of them. Do it, and they will remember you when the time is right and be your biggest advocates.

 

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Pass The 40…

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With my 40th birthday (4 months from today) looming, I have been thinking a lot about legacy lately. Of course, the soundtrack to Hamilton on constant repeat in my home these days, as well as the PBS special about the making of Hamilton still fresh in my mind might have something to do with it. Nonetheless, it is a real milestone birthday both personally and professionally and it has me thinking.

Will my clients say I worked hard and was always honorable and fair in my interactions? Will my employees say that I motivated them and offered them a path for growth, both personally and professionally?  Will my children be proud of my contributions at work, in the community and in their lives? Will my wife, family and friends continue to always support me along the way? All of these things are swirling around in my brain.

I read once (not sure where) that “leadership is about making others better as a result of your presence and making sure that impact lasts in your absence.” I hope that the narrative with me is that I always led by example both in the work place and at home and that those who worked for, lived with or chose to be a friend or collaborator with me, all felt that they benefited from my leadership.

I think that I have always been comfortable being a leader. In high school I wasn’t the best player on my varsity soccer or lacrosse teams (both of which went to the county finals my senior year mind you) but I was named a captain on both. In college, I chose my own path, my own major and ultimately made my own decision post college, to bet on myself and my own sales ability and not go down the conventional graduate school (well I did go to Law School for 29 days, but lets disregard that) path.  For the past 17 years I have consistently gravitated towards leader and “alpha male” roles, as that is just where I always felt the most comfortable and could provide the most upside and value.

I try to mentor others so I can teach them what I have learned (both good and bad) along the way and I also seek out mentors who can hopefully do the same for me. It is so important to take and implement what I have absorbed from those who have gone before me and I’d like to think that others get the same value from me. I am constantly trying to positively impact the lives of those around me and I hope that it super clear in my daily actions. While I know that doing the right thing is always my north star, I realize my intent might not always come through in my content. I am committed to doing a better job there.

I am so hungry for success and always shooting for the stars, but I try to put equal weight into remaining grounded, grateful and humble. I never forget where I came from, nor do I ever take for granted the many advantages I have had along the way. I try to remain hungry both in my pursuit of financial and professional success, as well as ways I can be a better person and give back to others. It is a constant balancing act and while I am not always perfectly level, I am keenly aware of when I need to tip the scales back to try and get there.

So I write this post to help point my compass in the right direction and so that I can hit my 40th birthday in stride. I don’t want to make new (birth) year’s resolutions to get better on that date, I want to be well on my way when I get there. I hope that I can motivate others in my 1977 class (or anyone else for that matter) to do the same.  If I can entice anyone who took the time to read through this to up their game and improve their own legacy, then I have already succeeded in that regard.

 

 

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SirceSquad: Shannon Adriaan

We typically have interns from The USA only, but we met Shannon from South Africa and fell in love. She has an incredible “can do” attitude and a great personality and we just had to have her. We thought you might like to learn more about her too, so we asked her some questions. Enjoy:

unnamedFull name and nickname?

My name is Shannon Adriaan.  Recently I have been called ShanSwag which is my favorite nickname that has ever been given to me- and I’ve been given A LOT.

Age?

I’m 22 :)

University?

Currently in my last year of my graphic design course at Inscape Design College, in Cape Town South Africa.

Major?

The graphic design course covers EVERYTHING within graphic design. We don’t focus on a specific field so I am super diverse at the moment. That also means we get a lot of work assigned to us within the 3 year course.

What made you choose Sircle Media?

My dream is to come and move to America, get a farm, get my horses and work. Been dreaming of New York my whole life so when it came to looking for an internship I wanted to grab the opportunity and Sircle Media gave off such a fun, energetic energy which I love. I have loads of energy so its great to find a place that I can feel comfortable being energetic with too.

Most surprising discovery/realization after working here for a couple of weeks?

No surprises just yet, but since I’m interning remotely and my hours go into 1am, I have realised I need a proper coffee machine. LOL

What is the best part of your internship?

I’m all hands on deck for the internship because I love to learn new things about the industry I’m about to go into. I love being able to develop on my own skills and learn new things in the process!

What can you tell us about Adam or your supervisor?

There isn’t one person who I have spoken with, who I don’t think is lovely. They are so great to deal with, from the one-to-one communication, to the mass e-mails, everyone is super friendly and on board! That part is so so refreshing and great to see.

Advice you would give to a future intern?

If you’re not a coffee lover, become one. ;)

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